Monthly Archives: March 2016

Ndebele’s Symbolism

Ndebele writes that “the visible symbols of the overwhelmingly oppressive South African social formation appear to have prompted over the years the development of a highly dramatic, highly demonstrative form of literary representation.” (143) He goes on to discuss the … Continue reading

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what is popular?

“But the popular, as has been suggested, is by character and convention somewhat traditional, or (in modern parlance) conservative: the community – mythic in its imagination – retains its coherent entity.” (143) the amalgamation in Chapman’s piece renders my understanding … Continue reading

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Urban Black Life in Drum and Little Libby

The selections from Drum Magazine are two-fold: while showcasing a wildly paternalistic view of 1950’s South African society, these early facsimiles also demonstrate a changing landscape by placing more emphasis on urban black populations. They squarely focus on blacks living … Continue reading

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Ndebele

Njabulo Ndebele’s offers a most interesting account of black South African writers’ journey towards the rediscovery of what he calls the ‘ordinary.’ In other words, Ndebele engages with the evolution of black South African literature from a state in which … Continue reading

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The Common Man, The Common Punchline

  Frederiksen, echoing Terry Hirst, suggests that mascot Joe is “‘a survivor who has to laugh to keep from crying’” (95). While the creators of the magazine do suggest that the magazine proffers some strain of counterdiscourse to the Kenyan … Continue reading

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Cross-Continental Quotidian Life

I really enjoyed Njabulo Ndebele’s “Rediscovery of the Ordinary” because it resonated in a lot of ways with the Open Book talk I just heard by Jenny Offill. Ndebele, of course, argues that much South African literature has focused on … Continue reading

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The Nuclear Family in Drum and How to Become Rich

In “Drum Magazine (1951-9) & The Spatial Configurations of Gender,” Dorothy Driver argues that Drum magazine, in its reproduction of American gender constructions, sought to establish “a modern form of romantic love within an ideology of domesticity, aiming for the … Continue reading

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