Tag Archives: J.M. Coetzee

Time in Disgrace

In his article, Derek Attridge touches on the ideas of time-passing, histories, and reminiscence that can be seen in Disgrace. He questions why, after the election of Nelson Mandela, Coetzee did not write something more uplifting or optimistic? (Attridge, 99) … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Judgment (Or Lack Thereof) In Disgrace

I was struck, while reading the Attridge article, by the offhand mentions to some of the most common criticisms of Disgrace – that readers see an implicit critique (or, at the very least, an undermining) of the new South Africa, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Bernard Response

Rita Bernard’s “Why Not to Teach Coetzee” comes off as a rather bizarre critique of J.M. Coetzee’s work, and its instruction within liberal academic institutions. The most prominent object of her attack seems to be Disgrace, a novel which almost … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Refuge and Lurie

Lucy’s “What if we don’t call it a visit? What if we call it refuge?” and the novel’s themes of comfort, roles, and existence inspired me to consider David’s relationship with Lucy and the University as places for him to … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Nonviolence

Disgrace was written in 1995, the year Nelson Mandela was elected. Of course temptation to take revenge on the white community was great. Crime rates in that period skyrocketed of course and many wealthy white people moved to gated communities. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Redemption in Disgrace?

  How are we to understand the workings of grace in Coetzee’s Disgrace? In this narrative, David falls from grace for abusing his young student, Melanie. Although in my own reading I see his advances as violations of the girl’s … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The narration of David Lurie in Disgrace

One of the things that stands out the most to me in Disgrace is Coetzee’s narrative style. Although the novel is written in the third-person, at times it reads almost like David Lurie’s own first-person account, but with a difference-this … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment