Author Archives: gcoly

Protected: Monsters: The figure of the perpetrator in Antjie Krog’s Country of my Skull: Guilt, Sorrow, and the Limits of Forgiveness in the New South Africa.

There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.

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Killjoy

In Our Sister Killjoy, brilliant Ghanaian writer Ama Ata Aidoo’s protagonist’s train of thought is to be followed like certain danse de salon are to be danced : swaying, left-right-left; past-present-future; Africa-Europe-Africa anew; Africans, Africans-in Europe; Europeans- in Africa. Sissie’s critical … Continue reading

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Abstract

Modern history is replete with success stories of nonviolent activists leading the charge against colonization and or racial segregation in their country. Such icons include household names like Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela. Through their various heroics, … Continue reading

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The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears

In the novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, Ethiopian immigrant Sepha Stephanos and his friends Joseph Kahangi and Kenneth live in Washington. The three friends came to the United States around the same time and met while working as … Continue reading

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Annotated Bibliography: Monsters: The figure of the perpetrator in Antjie Krog’s Country of my Skull: Guilt, Sorrow, and the Limits of Forgiveness in the New South Africa.

My paper will explore the more or less natural tendency to cast modern perpetrators of mass violence out of the realm of humanity both the general public and authors often manifest.To what extent Antjie Krog’s nonfiction buys into that or … Continue reading

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Ndebele

Njabulo Ndebele’s offers a most interesting account of black South African writers’ journey towards the rediscovery of what he calls the ‘ordinary.’ In other words, Ndebele engages with the evolution of black South African literature from a state in which … Continue reading

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Nonviolence

Disgrace was written in 1995, the year Nelson Mandela was elected. Of course temptation to take revenge on the white community was great. Crime rates in that period skyrocketed of course and many wealthy white people moved to gated communities. … Continue reading

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